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WHEN A BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP TURNS SOUR

In this advancing technological age, most business relationships end abruptly due to violations in policy or other complications. Some partners or employees are unable to carry out or complete the demands of the enterprise, and end up breaching a contract or violating regulations. The behavior of some former employees or partners following their removal from such a company may have some legal implications. In some occasions, these individuals may take action (that may even disregard the law) against the company or management.

Some Violations in Business Relationships and How to Handle Them

  1. Privacy

Privacy violations are a growing risk in the technological world. Sensitive and important information is safeguarded by a business. When this data is copied or stolen, then a crime has been committed. The individuals involved are held liable for selling, distributing and failure to protect private information.

  1. Stealing and Sharing of Information

Though companies are contracted to hold clients information, they are not allowed to share it without the customers consent. Violating the laws protecting this information may result in civil liability and punishable offenses. The same can be said for people who steal the information from the company. The information taken isn’t for the public and shouldn’t be shared online or by other means.

  1. Trade Defamation or False Advertising

The stolen information may be displayed in a way that conveys the business or management in a negative or false manner. This might expose the way the company is conducting its transactions, suggesting how the owner behaves or that he/she has certain characteristics which negatively impact the company. Should these allegations prove false, then it is slander. The law that governs false advertising also controls incorrect depictions that may deceive or mislead the public. The law provided for trade defamation also regulates any form of communication that reduces the status of an enterprise to the community.

  1. Contracts, Handbooks and Waivers

Employees are usually obligated sign documents before starting work at most companies and are provided with an employee handbook. This handbook may contain certain stipulations about what is considered against policy and what may or may not be done at work. They may also contain a waiver which relinquishes certain employee rights that he/she may have previously had. It removes privacy rights while in company premises (using the company’s computers or using the company’s software on a private computer). It also protects any information about the company. Any disregard and/or violation of this waiver might lead to litigation and/or further action if the actions of the employee negatively impacts the business.

  1. Cease and Desist

In a bid to make a disgruntled partner or employee stop legal action that may negatively impact a business, most companies usually provide a cease and desist letter. The letter (a cease and desist letter) is a writing sent to an individual or a company to stop any alleged illegal activity and to make sure that it isn’t repeated late in the future. Typically, this document is the first practical step in many to halt any illegal actions. It may eventually result in a lawsuit against the group or individual involved.


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